Did NCC Get Civic Location Right? Vote

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What’s the most controversial issue in Ottawa now?

The location of the Civic campus of The Ottawa Hospital.

So here is your chance to express your opinion on this most important of questions.

To read other opinions and news on the hospital location, click here, here and here.

 

Voting for this poll is closed. See Tuesday’s Bulldog for the final tally.

Thank you for participating.

 

You get one vote. Don’t forget to expand your opinion in the comment box below.

Thank you for participating.

 


 

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9 thoughts on “Did NCC Get Civic Location Right? Vote

  1. Isn’t it funny to hear from politicians when they don’t get their own way? For example, Councillor Allan Hubley: “I think this goes beyond city hall,” Hubley said. “This has to go grassroots. People in the city are going to have to speak up.”

    Oh yeah? And where were these same masterminds when the western LRT route was being planned by the City of Ottawa?

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    1. Sheridan:

      Yes and the people should speak up but where has been the debate at Ottawa City Hall on most issues, let alone the Civic?

      cheers

      kgray

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  2. Enough already … Seriously the Experimental Farm has more than enough land to do their research.
    Carling Avenue makes the most sense.

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  3. Has everyone forgotten that the important health care team does not take public transit.

    If a doctor is on call and gets an emergency the first thing he or she does is jump into the car.

    Hopefully they won’t need to take Highway 417 and get off at Parkdale. Lives can be at stake.

    Time for the big guns to leave the office and drive the route after 3 pm. on any given week day. Scott Street is such a disaster now I can’t imagine what the future will bring.

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    1. First, there will be parking available at Tunney’s but not to the extent that the hospital officials were calling for in their original 60 acres proposal.

      And surely there could be reserved parking available for the important health team. What LRT can do is provide public transit for the army of support staff (cleaners, cooks, maintenance, etc.), as well as most day patients and visitors.

      Again, the road systems can be changed for Tunney’s; as well, the surrounding bus traffic being so greatly reduced by LRT. The future will see fewer and fewer downtown parking spaces, and much higher parking fees for those spots available, and therefore less downtown car traffic overall.

      Like other big cities around the world, which do have downtown hospitals, many people arrive daily to the hospital via the public-transit system.

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      1. Sheridan:

        Will there be less bus traffic on Scott Street?

        Aren’t most of the wester bus routes converging on Scott so everyone can take the train?

        cheers

        kgray

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        1. Ken,

          By the time the new Civic Hospital is built, I fully expect Phase 2 of the Confederation LRT line to be built (south-west terminal at Baseline; west terminal at Bayshore), as well as the Baseline BRT to be in operation.

          The Express and 90-series buses will all be removed from Scott — with the exception of the 90-series between 2 a.m. and 5 a.m. when the LRT is out of service.

          There would have to be some decisions made, for example, the 85 from Bayshore, going along Carling to Preston to Albert, and then end at Pimisi Station (LeBreton Flats)? And how the local buses will be arranged has yet to be determined, but there are options available to avoid Scott.

          In short, OC Transpo has the LRT replacing many, many bus routes, and claiming to save over $100-million in the process.

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          1. Sheridan:

            Thank you for all your participation today and many, many others.

            I’ve covered light rail since 1998 (if someone told me in journalism school I’d be spending two decades covering LRT, I would have opted for that bowling career).

            The bus coral beside Scott Street at Tunney’s sure looks permanent … but it might just be a stop on the way.

            cheers

            kgray

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  4. For a hospital that will employ over 5,000 people and for which most people will come for scheduled treatment, re-locating the Civic to a site served by LRT makes sense. As well, we have heard from the paramedics that accessing Tunney’s will not be a problem. I am pleased that the Experimental Farm was not chosen.

    By the way, this is to be a $2-billion capital project, not approved by anybody except the Civic’s Board of Directors. The province only spends $2 billion on hospital capital projects annually – it has not indicated if this is on its list of priorities. Methinks we will be reading about this for some years to come.

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