EXERCISE YOUR RIGHT TO VENT: Bulldog Election Live Blog

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We’re on.

Ken Gray

The Bulldog will be live blogging throughout the day but, of course, it will heat up in the evening.

How to do it? Simple. Use the comment box below. Just like always on Bulldog.

Got an opinion, interesting fact that someone in the media has brought, disagree with something someone said? Use the comment box below. Debate. Have fun. What better day for free speech?

Let’s make this the liveliest place on election night. Don’t just watch the results. Participate.

As ever, your comments will be moderated by Bulldog editor Ken Gray to weed out libel, contempt and bad taste.













141 thoughts on “EXERCISE YOUR RIGHT TO VENT: Bulldog Election Live Blog

  1. Don’t let today’s miserable weather stop you from voting.
    This is the most important Ontario election in recent history.
    Get out there.
    This is what democracy is about.
    And after … come back and debate on The Bulldog.

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  2. Now here is confidence. Ottawa West-Nepean MPP Bob Chiarelli already has his victory party planned. His press release is below:

    BOB CHIARELLI HOSTS VICTORY PARTY
    Bob Chiarelli will be hosting a party after the polling stations close on Election Night.
    Date: June 7, 2018
    Time: 9:00pm
    Location: Tailgators, 1642 Merivale Road, Ottawa, ON K2G 4A1 (in the Merivale Mall)
    Note: Parking is available on the South side of the Merivale Mall. Tailgators is also accessible by elevator through the Merivale Mall.

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    1. Ken,
      It says he’s hosting a party.
      It might be a party will balloons and cake or one with black arm-bands and an eulogy.
      Either way – there will be booze.
      skoal,
      Chaz

      1+

      1. Yes.

        Booze.

        Appropriate for most political occasions.

        Wonder if Doug Ford will set up an open bar in the Legislature.

        cheers

        kgray

        1+

    2. Ken. I didn’t receive the above notification from Bob and am not sure why he’s taken me off his email list, and by the way, as you’re aware, I sign on to the Bulldog daily to voice my opinions and vent. I encourage everyone to do so. It is very cleansing and I believe participating will cut back greatly on my chances of having a heart attack, brain aneurysm, etc. At my age I already have enough physical ailments to deal with.

      All the best.

      1+

  3. Victory party aside, Ottawa West-Nepean is one of Ontario’s bellwether ridings.
    Its results will be among the most interesting in the province.

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  4. The National Post’s Andrew Coyne on the Ontario election:

    This election was said from the outset to be the Ontario Conservatives’ to lose, and let the record show they did their level best to lose it. No matter how it turns out, no one can take that away from them.

    To give up a 17-point lead in a four-week campaign takes discipline and hard work. Not many parties manage it; it requires just the right combination of dodgy ethics, incoherent platform, empty campaign and, most important, a shambling train wreck of a leader, whose least objectionable quality is that he was allegedly a big-time drug dealer in his youth.

    Sure, they got a little lucky, with their previous leader having been forced out over a range of sins ranging from allegedly unwanted sexual advances on teenage employees to an undisclosed loan from a prospective candidate. But to end the campaign with a quarter of their candidates facing lawsuits, elections law complaints or police investigation, for everything from identity theft to uttering threats — that’s not luck, that’s talent.

    1+

  5. Well, I slept in today. I stayed up until 11:30 last night. I was conditioning myself for tonight. I may have ta take a nap after dinner.
    To use words from sisco’s topic – Let the Crap Shoot begin.

    I think that the only way I’m going to keep sane is with satire and an attempt or two at humour.
    skoal,
    Chaz

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    1. Chaz:

      Please note that I discovered that emojis take up an amazing amount of space on a website.

      That slows the site down so I have been taking them out.

      cheers

      kgray

      0

  6. The National Post’s Christie Blatchford on Bob Rae’s NDP government:

    … then there was Peter North, an amiable fellow, MPP for Elgin, and tourism minister.

    In November 1992, he resigned after published allegations that he’d offered a government job to a woman, a bartender at a downtown club called the Loose Moose with whom he was having — wait for it — an as-yet unconsummated affair. He was cleared by the OPP of any criminal wrongdoing, but remains, to my knowledge, the only Canadian politician to lose his job over a sex scandal in which there was no actual sex.

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  7. The National Post has an interesting lineup of columnists. Probably the best in the country … even if you don’t agree with what they say.

    1+

  8. Coyne again:

    It’s easy to say the problem with the Tories is Ford: a blustering know-nothing with no discernible beliefs but a pronounced taste for havoc, the highlights of whose years in Toronto city politics were his attacks on the chief of police for investigating his brother, the mayor, and a finding by the city’s integrity commissioner that he had improperly intervened, as a councillor, on behalf of two clients of his family’s label-printing company.

    1+

    1. Don’t forget that fire Ford caused in the Big Smoke during the War of 1812. (Hey, if Trump can bring up an historical mistruth, then so can I).

      covfefe,
      Chaz

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    1. Oh, by the way, Chaz. I saw your trivia question concerning “Edsel” the other day. The answer is Edsel was one of Henry Ford’s sons.

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      1. sisco,
        The “rusted out Edsel” blocking the end of my driveway was referring to the car model called Edsel. And, yes Edsel was a son of Henry Ford , founder of Ford Motor Company. The Edsel was Edsel’s idea -guess that’s why he got a car named after himself.

        The bigger point is that the Edsel is talked about as one of the biggest mistakes and lemons of all time. Another Ford (different family) seems to fit that description too.
        skoal,
        Chaz

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  9. I’ve done all this without my first cup of coffee.

    I’m not responsible for all the typos.

    Get out the inter-venous bag of caffeine, dear.

    cheers

    kgray

    1+

  10. My clocks have all finished striking nine – let the games begin.
    I have more than 100 clocks and they are never fully synchronized – so I may be off on the time.
    skoal,
    Chaz

    0

      1. Ken,
        I was being a bit cryptic, perhaps I’ll say it this way. There are lots of people and we all don’t share the same thoughts at the same time but eventually we will all catch up. I hope the voters catch up to Ford’s ruse and vote accordingly before it’s too late.

        skoal,
        Chaz

        0

  11. Christie Blatchford recalled 1990.

    While I don’t recall these events, I’ll mention them :
    – 1917 , women get the right to vote in Ontario
    – 1929 , women are declared “persons” under Canadian Law

    I hope I’ll look back and remember 2018 as the year women didn’t allow another guy to pull the wool over their eyes. I think that too much testosterone may have resulted in a budgetless and platformless campaign from that guy.
    sincerely,
    Chaz

    1+

    1. I just wish we had a better choice this time out.

      Particularly with Ford, I see all those causes I fought for throughout my life taking a big step backward … including women’s rights inside my workplace when I was at the Winnipeg Free Press and elsewhere.

      cheers

      kgray

      2+

  12. The Globe and Mail didn’t endorse anybody:

    This election has been a forlorn hunt for the needed mixture of integrity and smart policy. The electorate cannot vote for leadership where it does not exist, or for platforms that are wrong for the times. So if you are lucky enough to have a local candidate who embodies integrity and principle, we encourage you to support him or her. The representatives you choose will need to be strong to hold the next premier to account. Who do you trust to do so?

    How do you expect people to vote when opinion leaders such as the Globe refuse to make a choice? A bit of a cop out … though one your agent considered.

    1+

    1. Ken,
      That Globe position is a cop-out.
      I’m glad you chose not to take that route. I also hope that voters don’t cop-out. At this time, I seem to not have enough fingers to cross. We’ll see.
      skoal,
      Chaz

      1+

    2. ‘The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who, in times of great moral crisis, maintain their neutrality.’ – Dante.

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  13. Ken/Chaz. The biggest problem with the provincial PCs is they listen to the people who sit in their backroom(s) and develop strategies that don’t work.

    It was a problem in 2014 and is again in 2018. It’s not the candidates who blow a 17-point lead in the polls it’s the “brain trust”. I’d like to share a little secret for anyone cares to listen – it’s time for the PCs to find people in their organization who care about those who live in the province and stop worrying about winning elections. They would have far more success if they took this approach.

    On another note, I just voted about half an hour ago. I was surprised there were nine candidates on the ballot, some had faux political organizations under their names while others were just names – very intriguing indeed. I did not recognize all the names so obviously I did not do a good job on my pre-election homework although none of them changed my mind on who I would support.

    And one final comment (for now), I am looking forward to all the visual pollution containing candidates’ names and pictures disappearing from the landscape in the next day or so. Unfortunately, we will be faced with a municipal election and all the accompanying rah-rah-rah shortly. So much for having a nice summer looking at the ferns and trilliums, and watching the birds and squirrels.

    1+

    1. Sisco:

      A really good point about the Tories … they should start worrying about what people want rather than winning elections.

      Any party that would offer Doug Ford as a candidate is absolutely bankrupt of ethics and ideas.

      And if Ford wins, extrapolate that to the people of Ontario.

      cheers

      kgray

      3+

  14. Hello to all the people who read and participate in the Bulldog website on a regular basis as well as those who read it periodically and any newbies who decided to join today’s fun. Regular readers know I appreciate my privacy and as Ron Benn pointed out a few weeks ago the privacy laws in Canada do not yet extend to politics. Today I received a fifth telephone call from local PC candidate Goldy something-or-other reminding me, in a condescending tone, that today was election day and blah, blah, blah. Like her or not, and I don’t, Kathleen Wynne was at least respectful enough to leave only one voice message. Goldy, Doug, leave me the hell alone.

    1+

  15. This is not a dig, or quip or satire:

    On my way into town I passed a bunch of the little 3′ x 3′ candidate signs and one property that had two of the large signs (maybe 6′ x 4′). The two signs were blue. I just grinned.

    On my way home, I noticed that one of the signs was a tad bigger than the other and that one was for the PC candidate and the other was a real estate for sale sign. No lie, the for sale sign was the bigger one.
    skoal,
    Chaz

    So, I actually laughed.

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  16. The CBC poll tracker has Doug Ford’s PCs with an almost 90-per-cent chance of forming a majority government.

    God help us all.

    kgray

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  17. I just turned on the TV and was watching the news. During the commercials I flipped through the TV guide listings.
    How appropriate:
    Les Miserables is on now and later tonight there is a show called Swamp Mysteries at 10 pm.

    I will watch them both and flip back to the news during commercials, and I’ll also open up The Bulldog too. Gawd, I may need to replace the batteries in the remote and the hinge on my laptop. lol

    skoal,
    Chaz

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  18. There is a disconnect between the concept of allowing the grass-root members to select the leader of the party and the actual execution of the leadership campaign. What is held out to be grass-root support is too often dominated by a small, very active, very vocal special interest group. They are the ones who will sign up a long list of supporters, sometimes using their own $10 bills to pay for, and sometimes not remitting any (an allegation against Patrick Brown supporters), membership fees. It is a sad situation that infests all of the major parties to varying degrees.

    There is an excellent column in the National Post by Father Raymond de Souza that discusses the inherent moral corruption within all of the parties, at the local riding level all the way up to the cabinet. The biggest challenge political parties will face if they try to cleanse themselves of this type of corruption is that the party and riding executives are dominated by the very people who encourage this type of behaviour. People who believe that the end justifies the means. More rules will not solve the equation. More rules just change the list of what needs to be circumvented or ignored. To cite Senator Vern White in reference to the Senate expenses scandal, “It all starts with integrity.”

    The list of people with strong leadership skills and great sense of integrity who are prepared to roll around in the muck with these “rabid dogs” (my apologies for the mixed metaphor), is short. An old adage about those who wrestle with pigs must expect to get dirty comes to mind. Why would strong leader with a great sense of integrity want to get dirty (in both meanings of the word)?

    So, in their stead we have PC leader Doug Ford, who believes he is entitled to start at the top, with little demonstrated understanding of how a parliamentary government works, and even less regard for the intellect of the residents of Ontario.

    We have a number of NDP candidates who have made racist comments and/or blanket statements condemning those in positions of authority (the same authority that they will be more than willing to pledge allegiance to if elected, as long as there is a $100K+ stipend to soothe their hypocrisy) on social media, and whose leader declines to do much more than ask for the next question.

    We have most of the Liberal cabinet running for re-election. The same group who saw nothing wrong with “pay-for-access” fund-raisers, replete with quotas set by the party executive.

    Sadly, I fear that we are in the middle of a circular reference, with no apparent solution.

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    1. Ron:

      Further to your point.

      The Wynne government passed legislation that developers and unions could not donate to municipal candidates.

      Of course what happens is that individuals in the organizations donate rather than the over-riding entity.

      Then Wynne raises the amount of donations. Then she allows super-pacs in municipal elections.

      The problem is now worse than before but Wynne can trumpet that she solved the issue. Right. Look how the high-rise and zoning report was handled. A travesty. We individual taxpayers and citizens are shut out from this very important report. The developers weren’t.

      And of course, I’m sure she doesn’t turn down a lot donations either. That’s because she is beholden to the same people municipal candidates are.

      She gave us the appearance of curbing undue influence but really did not.

      The result is zoning out the window and undue influence by the moneyed.

      That’s not democracy. That’s public relations.

      We are in the middle of a circle. Power swirls around us but citizens have very little.

      But before I get too sanctimonious, the very citizens who are shut out of power … don’t care.

      And that’s the most dangerous threat to democracy. It lets people such as Ford get into power. While the Fords mobilized their people to take over the Tory party, the rest of us didn’t care.

      Happy election day. Get out and vote.

      cheers

      kgray

      1+

  19. Again, back to a comment I made a few days ago. A first-time premier with a majority government, i.e. Ford or Horwath, is not a good thing. We can look to Kathleen for proof of that.

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  20. Keeping up with election slogans. I promise to not just find efficiencies somewhere, sometime, someday but I, indeed, HAVE FOUND an efficiency to help the voter vote.
    Equipment required:
    – a coin
    – magic marker

    Assembly:
    – using the marker, mark an L on one side of the coin and an N on the other side

    Can you see where this is heading?

    There now mark your ballot. NDP/Liberal coalition will be our savior.
    skoal,
    Chaz

    1+

  21. Ken/Ron. First off, my last comment does not segue with the last one each of you made. Presumably the mine was made while yours were awaiting review.

    However, the last comments each of you made, especially Ron’s reference to pigs, brought to mind “Animal Farm” by George Orwell, in which the game among the animals was played fairly until the pigs changed the rules in their favour. Perhaps we should change the two-letter short form for Ontario from ON to AF.

    1+

  22. The Globe and Mail’s Gary Mason on what’s wrong with Ontario:

    The decline in Ontario’s political class has mirrored a ceaseless deterioration in the influence the province once wielded nationally. As the country’s most populous jurisdiction, Ontario still has plenty of weight to throw around. But in many ways, economic and political power in Canada has been shifting westward, along with people. Ontario no longer has the voice everyone must listen to in the federation. Toronto is still the greatest city in the country, but beyond its borders, the province’s landscape is littered with towns and cities in deep, deep trouble.

    1+

  23. Theo Moudakis cartoon :

    VOTE TODAY

    complain tomorrow

    To that I would like to add:

    Unless you want to vote PC – then you can vote on FRIDAY

    1+

  24. I’ve been bopping around the neighbourhood today running errands and the like and I can’t find anybody who is supporting PC leader Doug Ford.

    Everyone I talk to is appalled that it looks like Ford will not only win but win a majority.

    Sad days indeed.

    So where are his supporters?

    cheers

    kgray

    0

    1. Ken, based on a simple walk through Centrepointe, the PC candidate has far more signs on private property than anyone else. I would dare to say that his signs outnumber all of the others combined.

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  25. From what I’ve been reading throughout the day is the options are either a PC majority or a Liberal/NDP coalition? What a sad, sad state this province is in.

    0

    1. Sisco:

      I just find it astonishing that Ontarians can buy that garbage from Ford.

      Look at the guy. Would you buy a used car from that guy?

      cheers

      kgray

      2+

    2. Maybe people will panic after all the bad press from the lawsuit against Ford.

      It reminds them of the sleazy days of Rob Ford in Toronto with Doug propping him up.

      cheers

      kgray

      1+

  26. Tony Clement is on CBC and he is just talking about Ford like he is just another leader.

    Surely Clement can see through this. What’s his MO supporting Ford?

    kgray

    0

    1. Tony Clement is a Tory first and foremost. He is just working the party line, making sure that the talking points are publicized on voting day.

      1+

      1. Ron:

        I sure you’re correct but guys like Clement should be able to see through Ford and at least be silent.

        Maybe Clement still has political aspirations but I don’t think the public sees much in Clement.

        His best-before date was long ago.

        cheers

        kgray

        2+

        1. Too many former politicians want to relive their glory days. Put a microphone in front of them and they talk.

          Maybe he wants a consulting contract to identify all that government inefficiency? Just to supplement his pension.

          1+

          1. Maybe ole Tony sees some more gazebo-building in his future. Is he setting himself up for a senior position in Ford’s staff? He was an MPP and knows the ropes at Queen’s Park.
            Or maybe he wants to be on the right side of Ford for future lobbying opportunities. Maybe he’s tired of sitting on the Opposition bench in Ottawa under Scheer. He’s in his late 50s and has been an MPP/MP for almost 20 years. Time for a change?

            1+

  27. It is interesting that Yasir Naqvi, Liberal Ottawa Centre, has put signs on his signs saying he is a good MPP.

    Looks like he is distancing himself from Kathleen Wynne. Sounds like Naqvi is a bit desperate. k

    0

    1. At an all candidates meeting for Ottawa West-Nepean a week-and-a-half ago, not once did Bob Chiarelli mention the premier’s name. Veteran Liberal MPPs who want to get re-elected know enough to avoid associating themselves with her.

      0

        1. That is likely to be a very short menu.

          I think that the Ontario Liberals should take their time, unless there is a minority government. A candidate from outside of the past caucus would be ideal, as too many of the current (until later tonight) caucus are tainted with the legacy of the last 15 years. Is there someone sitting in the federal caucus who has leadership aspirations?

          1+

          1. I don’t know. What do you think?

            Looks like Justin Trudeau will be around for awhile.

            Ontario Grits might look to the province. k

            1+

            1. Quite frankly, I haven’t paid much attention to the federal Liberal caucus. There are a few reasonably effective ministers, but aside from the Minister McKenna I am not sure which ones are from Ontario. As for the back benchers, what was it that PM Trudeau the First said about them? Something to the effect of nobodies.

              I was musing about a federal MP being interested, just as Jagmeet Singh shifted from the federal scene to the provincial, as did Patrick Brown.

              0

    2. Ken:

      All the local Liberal incumbents are looking and sounding desperate. It really does show that Kathleen Wynne didn’t win the last election as much as Tim Hudak lost it. The province really wants change and is going to show it tonight.

      0

  28. Liberal pundit Warren Kinsella, a mighty astute political observer, has made his election call:

    PCs 73 seats;
    NDP 47;
    Lib. 4;
    Green 1.

    Let’s see how it works out.

    0

    1. Warren Kinsella has been scathing in his evaluation of the Liberal campaign, and surprisingly supportive of Doug Ford.

      0

  29. NDP thinks it can win Ottawa Centre.

    Tories hope to pick up Ottawa West-Nepean and Orleans.

    This might be bellwether ridings. k

    0

    1. Orleans is showing strong Liberal support, while Ottawa West Nepean has the NDP leading. It looks like Ottawa PC support is more wishful thinking that hope.

      0

      1. I thought Lisa MacLeod was smarter than throwing such unswerving support behind Ford.

        Think the PC party might fracture over Ford’s leadership in a year or two?

        Then where is MacLeod? k

        0

        1. She is an opportunist, and is all in for a cabinet position. Whether Doug Ford rewards her is another question.

          0

  30. Interesting that all four analysts on CBC are women.

    Think that would have happened two decades ago?

    Even if Ford wins big tonight, he can’t stop the slow march of women in society. k

    0

    1. With Christine Elliott as leader, the PC’s would take more than 45 per cent of the popular vote. It beats me why so many members of the PC grass roots (see my comment above for my thoughts on that topic) were more intent in picking Doug Ford and all his baggage than selecting a leader who has the experience and gravitas to win handily.

      0

    1. She should take a close look at the opportunity. She has a solid resume and is a relatively fresh face, so she doesn’t wear the Liberal legacy.

      0

  31. Ottawa West Nepean – Chandra Parma of the NDP has the early lead over Bob Chiarelli and Jeremy Roberts (PC). Ms. Parma presented very well at an all candidates meeting a couple of weeks ago. She spoke clearly, segued questions to the NDP platform smoothly. In contrast, Bob Chiarelli appeared to be weary, and was very argumentative. Roberts was underwhelming, although in fairness, he couldn’t segue to the PC platform, as there was none.

    1+

  32. The ridings inside the Greenbelt appear to be impervious to PC blue. It appears to be an even split between the NDP and the Liberals. The ridings outside of the Greenbelt, and in particular to the west and south remain PC strongholds.

    0

          1. Still hasn’t said no but she doesn’t have a machine across the city. Rick probably does and the Chiarelli name still resonates. k

            0

    1. She may not see this as a blessing. Having sat front and centre for so long, how enthusiastic will she be sitting in the back corner of the legislature?

      0

      1. Not excited at all. She will be gone as leader once a new one shows.

        But her leaving puts the Grits’ official party status in jeopardy. She’s in a tight spot. k

        0

  33. I don’t drink but I guess that buck-a-beer is a sure thing now.

    Maybe the PCs will hold another ousting and elect a new leader. Anybody got some scandal in their back pocket? With the things this guy has said and done – there has got to be something, I hope.

    skoal,
    Chaz

    1+

    1. Chaz:

      It’s only a matter of time before Ford loses support in his own caucus.

      I doubt he will see four years.

      k

      2+

    1. One seat does not equate with real. I suspect that a big chunk of his support took the form of a “none of the above” vote, in much the same way that the NDP collected seats in Quebec a couple of federal elections ago. A safe vote knowing that the candidate wouldn’t be able to do any harm in the legislature.

      0

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