For Whom Do I Vote?

This topic contains 5 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by sisco farraro 2 months, 2 weeks ago.

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #751956 Reply

    Chaz

    The Conservatives lost a leader, the Liberals lost a leader; I wonder if I can talk one more to step aside?

    I am still in shock. What could happen next?

    I had no choice who I was voting for because I saw Premier Kathleen Wynne as the leader with the most experience and I like centre-left. For me, NDP leader Andrea Horwath was running a close second and the third guy scares me too much to even look his way.

    Where do I go now ? Give my second choice a try or hope that Wynne’s replacement will be fine.

    I now know exactly how Bernie supporters must have felt.

    skoal,
    Chaz

    2+
    #752079 Reply

    sisco farraro

    Chaz. At election time, provincial and federal anyway, I usually vote for the party whose leader I feel will do the best job of steering the ship. In light of this, I am concerned for the future of the province. In another comment I wrote recently, I noted at the end of election night I hope we don’t end up with a majority government led a first-time premier. Let them earn that right by effectively managing a minority government first.

    0
    #752134 Reply

    Chaz

    sisco,
    After Ms. Wynne’s announcement – the best I am hoping for is a coalition government of Liberal and NDP.
    I don’t want the Ford nation in there anywhere.
    Regarding the PCs – the only thing I can hope for is for the Conservatives “to earn the right” to pick a better leader, preferably one that doesn’t believe that Leave it to Beaver is reality TV.
    skoal,
    Chaz

    0
    #752090 Reply

    The Voter

    People seem to have difficulty understanding the Westminster form of government as it is practiced in Canada.

    You do not vote for the premier (or prime minister) unless you happen to live in that individual’s riding. You vote for your local candidate and the party that wins the most seats, in most scenarios, becomes the government with their leader, as head of that government, becoming premier. Living in the Ottawa area, you cannot vote for the leader of any party be that Horvath, Wynne, Ford or any of the leaders of smaller parties.

    In some not-too-distant times, the voters of Ottawa South had the opportunity to cast a vote for a party leader but not to elect someone premier. Only the combination of that person winning his own seat AND more of his party’s candidates being successful than those of any other party could make him premier*. Even if every riding but one elected a Tory, Doug Ford could be unsuccessful in his own pursuit of a seat. It would be interesting to see his next move.

    The role of premier or prime minister is not to be the source of all policy and government. They are supposed to be “primus inter pares” – first among equals – not the sole holder of power. We have allowed some politicians to abuse these concepts so that they have absorbed the powers of government into their office so that cabinet members are no longer equal to the person at the head of the parade.

    It’s past time that we corrected this aberration and stopped feeding into the power trips of our leaders or would-be leaders.

    If you are focusing your vote on the person at the head of the party, why do we bother with local candidates? What do you do if you want to vote for leader X but all of that party’s candidates are incompetent fools? Your vote should be given to your local candidate based on the platform they put forward combined with that individual’s personal qualifications and experience.
    * Yes, I know you can be premier without a seat in the House. It wouldn’t last long though. They would either find a seat or be replaced pretty quickly.

    1+
    #752167 Reply

    Chaz

    The Voter,
    I think everyone reading the Bulldog is well aware how the Premiet becomes the Premier.
    Party politics has always meant that one votes for the party that one thinks they want in power this time around. The local candidate is secondary in many cases and even if your locally elected candidate sits in the back benches of a majority party then he/she has the influence of a doorknob with cabinet. People would vote for a turnip if the turnip was the candidate of the party you wanted to rule. As an example,the last Federal election was more anti Harper than pro Liberal.
    The concept of primus inter pares has not existed since Robert Walpole and it didn’t exist then either.
    skoal,
    Chaz

    0
    #752192 Reply

    sisco farraro

    Voter. Agreed. We are also supposed to live in a “representative democracy” where our local politician is supposed to poll constituents in some manner prior to voting on an issue in parliament or at Queen’s Park and even at city hall. However, we now live in a world of “partisan politics” where individual issues no longer matter, where if, for example, a Liberal candidate sits in parliament on our behalf, all issues are decided by the stance the Liberal party takes whether the people in an individual constituency agree or not. This is a problem in my opinion. The term “lazy” is applied to politicians frequently on the Bulldog, this method of running the country, the province, the city (where Jim Watson decides policy) is a major contributor to this problem.

    0



Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
Reply To: For Whom Do I Vote?
Your information:





<a href="" title="" rel="" target=""> <blockquote cite=""> <code> <pre> <em> <strong> <del datetime=""> <ul> <ol start=""> <li> <img src="" border="" alt="" height="" width="">