Old fashioned ways

This topic contains 5 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by Chaz 11 months, 1 week ago.

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
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  • #736179 Reply

    Nicholas

    I’ve been trying to formulate this for a few days now but don’t quite seem to be able to get it right so I’ll just put it out there. I think I’m a dinosaur. I have a very strict respect for rule of law and if you don’t like a law change it, or lobby to have it changed. What happened to that? These days everyone bends rules left and right because it’s easier than enforcement.

    While a few examples have made it to the media in recent months the one that bothers me most is local.

    Ottawa Public Health (OPH) opened a pop up safe injection site because another group already had an illegal one going. Councillor Rick Chiarelli pressed Dr. Isra Levy to close the site this group was running, which was the right response, but instead we get OPH actually ignoring the law and opening a site of their own. Sure, it’s being run by Sandy Hill Community Health (SHCH) who have the approval to run a facility at their building in Sandy Hill, but that won’t open for another month or two. Why is OPH opening a site of their own instead of helping ShCH expedite their approved facility? This OPH pop-up site is still not an approved site and OPH doesn’t have the authority to approve one otherwise we would’ve had one ages ago (despite Mayor Watson’s opposition I suspect). We have an approved site already but it’s not open yet. Anything else is illegal. Colloquially speaking, all OPH has done is nationalise the offending site instead of closing it.

    I don’t remember when we lost the respect for the law, if it’s always been that way, or if it’s just the old coot in me finally speaking his mind, but I’m seeing far too many ‘cause du jour’ win the day because it’s easier than saying no.

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    #736185 Reply

    Ken Gray
    Keymaster

    Nicholas:

    Thank you for getting involved in The Bulldog Forum.

    Your voice is always welcome.

    Your concern is my concern.

    I think since the pot shops flew in the face of the law, the rule of law has taken a beating.

    We have collectively signed on to support the law … one way or the other.

    People need to step up and defend it … not contribute to its erosion.

    cheers

    kgray

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    #736195 Reply

    Ron Benn

    Nicholas, I share your general concerns for actions that fly in the face of the law. I have commented in the past about slippery slopes, so I won’t regurgitate that dialogue here.

    I think that one of the things that plagues those who are impatient for change is the notion that the end justifies the means. It is a philosophical issue, with the challenge being that the righteousness of the end it is always in the eye of the beholder. All those shades of gray (no pun intended Ken) are not solely the reserve of the author or the film director.

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    #736198 Reply

    Chaz

    Sorry, but far too many things have only changed for the better because people stood up against the law of the day. I will not repeat my short list or get into the slippery slopes argument again.

    I do wonder where South Africa would be if Mandela hadn’t have stood against the law.
    I do wonder how many gay men might have criminal records if people hadn’t broken the law.
    I do wonder how many women may have undergone back-room abortions if doctors hasn’t broken the law.

    Who judges what law to break and which to bow down to? I leave that to each issue as an individual issue.

    I will not make a blanket statement that says the law is the be all and end all.

    Can the law be broken – yes, please yes.

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    #736204 Reply

    Ken Gray
    Keymaster

    Chaz

    There are lots of ways to protest without breaking the law.

    In our own little way, we’re doing that here.

    Martin Luther King did well with non-violent protest.

    cheers
    kgray

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    #736236 Reply

    Chaz

    But Ken, breaking the law does not mean violence.

    In your example laws were indeed broken. They were broken many times.

    Didn’t non-violent law breakers get arrested for doing things like drinking from the wrong fountain. They broke other laws too, like interracial marriage laws. They broke the law and suffered accordingly.

    Sometimes it is okay to break the law and be non-violent while doing so.

    skoal,
    Chaz

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